Mojo
Detailing the travails of an inept handful of (very) small-time mobsters who run afoul of the real thing, Mojo gives us an entertaining vision of a 1958 London obsessed with imported Rock & Roll and American fashions, yet still profoundly British almost to the point of caricature.

The Gates of Egypt
Stephen Sewell’s new play, The Gates of Egypt is a clarion call to extend ourselves beyond our individual temporal concerns and act within a larger moral framework.

The Glass Boat
Bubbling with bouncy banter including every ludicrous Aussie-vernacular-cliché under our collective sunburnt brow, The Glass Boat loosely themes itself on time-travel, Christmas and a mental institution.

Eva Yerbabuena
That Eva’s been dancing since 12 should surprise noone, since she does it with such consummate self-assuredness: while I’m gasping, in anxious anticipation of a fatal error, she’s dancing her heart and soul out.

Madeleine Peyroux
The beautifully delicate crooning of Madeleine Peyroux, weighted with pained honesty of heart ache, loneliness and yearning, seems to be more suited to a more intimate venue rather than the vast space of the State Theatre.

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