Talented and prize-winning young playwright Emme Hoy was last night awarded the NSW Philip Parsons Fellowship for Emerging Playwrights.

Supported by Belvoir St Theatre, the Fellowship provides a commission of $12,500, with a further $7,500 available for script development. It will support the development of Hoy’s new play which could go on to be staged at upstairs Belvoir.

“I’m so excited and grateful to have been offered the amazing opportunity that is the Philip Parsons Fellowship. Being gifted the time, space and mentorship to develop a new work is so important for emerging writers, and I am so thrilled to have been given the chance,” said Hoy.

“It's so gratifying to see many theatre companies like Belvoir support new writing, because new stories are important. We are the stories that we tell ourselves; both as humans, and as a country – and in order to keep changing and developing we need to keep telling new stories; listening, and trying to understand more about other people, and ourselves," she added

NIDA graduate Hoy (Writing for Performance, 2016) is currently resident playwright at the Old 505 Theatre and co-artistic director of The Louise Frequency. She was one of the inaugural emerging writers recognised by the Sydney Theatre Company in their Emerging Writers Group, which was announced at the Patrick White Playwrights’ Award and Fellowship earlier this year.

Hoy becomes the second NIDA graduate to be awarded NSW Philip Parsons Fellowship for Emerging Playwrights, after Julia-Rose Lewis (Writing for Performance, 2015) won it in 2014 for her play Samson, which she wrote while at NIDA.

“Emme is a great writer with a wonderful future and we are all proud of the contribution NIDA has made to her well-earned success,” commented NIDA’s Head of Writing for Performance Dr Stephen Sewell, who attended last night’s award ceremony at Belvoir St Theatre.

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