Your Life As A Dyke

Your Life As A Dyke is the pseudo, kinda, sorta sequel to My Life as a Dyke, conceived, ‘written’ and performed by two young talents, Nik Willmott and Rachel Forgasz.

It’s gay content aimed at a predominantly gay audience, but what’s unique about Your Life As A Dyke is that it is entirely audience-inclusive, turning the spot light on the people in attendance.

The show begins and Nik holds a microphone up to the audience, asking questions, hearing their stories, probing and cajoling anecdotes out of whoever’s willing to share, while bantering with Rach, busily jotting down the information acquired.

After interval, the Dyke-dactic Duo hold a mirror up to nature, playing out the information from the first half, while including audience members in a welcoming, non-confrontational way as part of the act.

Nik’s rapport with the audience is fun and friendly, while Rachel’s singing voice, range of accents and improvisational ability all provide memorable moments.

But disregard all of the above because the show’s potentially different every night.

It’s Theatre Sports meets Nik and Rachel’s own brand of commedia d’lesbotainment. Your Life As A Dyke is a fun night out, regardless of whether you’re straight, gay or indifferent. It runs until February 9th at the Gasworks Theatre (or Fart Factory as the venue is so endearingly referred to during the show). Don’t miss it.


Your Life as A Dyke

Venue: Gasworks Theatre
Dates: Wed 30 Jan to Sat 2 Feb, Tue 5 to Sat 9 Feb
Time: 7.30pm
Tickets: $28/$20
Bookings: 9699 3253 and  tty:9699 4367  www.gasworks.org.au

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