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The Will
Written by Emily Garrett   
Tuesday, 27 September 2011 17:30

The raw quality of the acting coupled with the thought provoking subject matter makes for a very enjoyable and highly entertaining piece. The Will takes place within the four fibro walls in the rental of our typical mid-twenties Aussie, made cosy for us with the close-to-action intimacy provided by the space in the Tap Gallery. It centres around a young photographer who, chronically ill, decides to record his last goodbyes on a video.

Mixed media is combined in ways effective and original; the video screen in the background acts as a prop and a device whereby a series of photos and footage are shown. This adds to the modern, ‘real’ and very present atmosphere of the piece, and with a well structured, smoothly flowing narrative, we are wholly engaged throughout.

While there’s more than a few laughs to be had – among many, the references to canned tuna as the staple for the recently moved out young adult – there flows through it an undercurrent rich in tragedy and the poignancy of human experience. Because despite the gags – when there is discussion on why men are dysfunctional, the answer is: ‘A defect from being born from women’ – it is essentially a tragedy, that cleverly circles the themes of life, death, relationships, communication and loss. A unique performance worth seeing.


2011 Sydney Fringe Festival
The Will
written and directed by Amy Maddison

Venue: Tap Gallery | 278 Palmer Street, Sydney
Dates: Sep 20 – 25, 2011
Tickets: $21.50 –$16.00
Bookings: http://thesydneyfringe.com.au






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